Onto a town called Alice

Julia Creek was only ever intended to be a stop over. We had just enough time to set up the van and duck across the road, literally across the road, to check out the local pool. Yes the pool tour continues. Julia Creek is a pretty small place but it can boast a really lovely public pool. Clean, well maintained and great water quality. Craig knows a smart guy who grew up here and took a photo of The Knowledge Place. Now we know where he got it! I stayed well clear of it to ensure the gaffs continue.  This flat land is providing a smorgasbord of awesome sunrise and sunset photos, so just like baby pictures, prepare to be inundated with them. (Mum, I don’t know if you know this – but you can click on the pictures to have a larger view of them)

Sundays are a bane to the traveller! Especially in the smaller towns. Mount Isa fortunately has a pretty impressive info centre with the Riversleigh Display, Art Gallery, Museum and gardens all in the one centre! It’s worth stopping in to have a look especially at the Riversleigh Centre where they display ancient marsupial fossils to the modern marsupials skeletons.

My impression of Isa wasn’t great. It’s not a place that I’ve added to the list to revisit. My impression is probably tainted by setting up camp in the rainy weather in an average caravan park, reading notices on the back of toilet doors about how to minimise lead poisoning in your children, and then add to that the change from warm to cold weather.  Worst part of that is knowing it was only going to get colder. Yes, I know it was officially Winter and I shouldn’t complain.  The cold is my cryptonite.  Hate the bloody stuff.

The land here is flat. Very, very flat. As we drive away from Mount Isa, we hit the occasional small rise in the road and are treated to an almost 360 degree view of the landscape. No hills or bumps evident on the horizon, just more wide, flat land.  From beaches, to dry country, rainforests, tropical islands, gorges, waterholes, red dirt and flat land with big skies.  We’ve covered a lot of ground in Queensland.

The trek through Queensland
The trek through Queensland
Crossing the NT border from Qld
Crossing the NT border from Qld

We’ve made it into the Northern Territory!  I was very excited to come back here. I had a two year posting in Darwin about 25 years ago. It was a fond and memorable time and I was looking forward to seeing places I didn’t manage to visit the first time and revisiting some of the old places.

We caught on the news that Alice Springs and the surrounding region had a deluge of unseasonal rain. Alice Springs seemed to cop the worst of it and we saw a photo of the police station with a carpet of hailstones. When we arrived at Barkley Homestead where there was no red dirt to worry about because it was loads of red mud. It wasn’t too bad and made a nice change from the dust. The only time it did matter was when you were tip toeing your way to the ablutions block. The layout of the campsites here was great! Each site had an island where you could access power and water, large shade trees and the centre of the island had sections of AstroTurf and large gravel which got any remaining mud off and helped to keep the inside of the van fairly clean. This place even had a pool! Toes were dipped in the water and all agreed the water was probably too cold to swim in. Craig won’t let the kids say the water is freezing unless there are icebergs floating around in it. So a broader vocabulary is being used such as “very, very cold”, “invigoratingly cold” or “incredibly bloody refreshing”. A popular servo and hotel out the front means the fuel is good and so is the food. We didn’t eat there but went over at happy hour to listen to a couple of pretty decent country crooners, have a drink and take advantage of the free wifi!

The information centre at Tennant Creek had a museum that displayed what it was like to live and grow up in Tennant Creek through the eyes of a young boy during the gold rush.  It was a pretty hard life in harsh conditions.  The information presented was lightened up with some funny anecdotes from the time and it looks like they knew how to have a good time despite the circumstances.

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This pool was technically freezing
This pool was technically freezing

This stretch of the trip has a whole lot of not much. We broke up the drive by staying near Karlu Karlu or better known as The Devils Marbles. We set up camp at the Devils Marbles Hotel in Wauchope (pronounced War-cup) where a nice little beer garden complete with pool drew the kids attention. Everyone expected the water to be cold and Xavier covered his bum by bringing a piece of ice with him.  He jumped in after throwing the ice into the pool so he could confidently proclaim that it was technically freezing.  Didn’t stop my crazies from getting wet.

A quick change and we’re off to see the sunset at Karlu Karlu. It’s a pretty set of rock formations and as we walk towards them the kids are pointing out rock ‘bums’ everywhere. They did kinda look like giant rock bums. Lots of people had climbed the rocks and kids were playing around on them. Our kids fell in with another group of kids who showed them a rock cubby house and we enjoyed another lovely sunset.  Told you! Another million sunset photos.

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Just down the road is Wycliffe Well, the UFO capital of Australia.  The van park/servo is really daggy.  There is alien ‘everything’ everywhere.  Kids loved it!  All three of them.

IMG_7128Alice Springs is a place where we spent a bit of time shopping and prepping for a tent adventure to the McDonnell Ranges.  We decided to hole up at the Big4 so the kids have plenty to do while Craig and I do the boring stuff.  The kids are pretty much guaranteed a bouncing pillow and pool with waterfall or slide.  The pool was heated which made it feel all the more cold once you’re out! A long line of shivering children waited their turn along the stairwell of the spiral slide.

We managed to fit in a couple of tourist outings while we were in town.  The Alice Springs School of the Air museum was interesting.  You get a great overview of the vast area they service, how the kids on remote stations are taught and we got to sit in on a teacher teaching a kindy class.  She rocked into her ‘classroom’ wearing a neon, green wig and ended up painting a spider and web on her face.  We also picked up an excellent phrase of hers, “Don’t cry. Try!” Feel free to use this on your toddler or adult who hasn’t yet progressed out of the tantrum phase.

The highlight of The Reptile Centre was being able to handle various lizards and a python. Watching the Thorny Devils feast on ants was entertaining and trying to spot the hidden Death Adders was a little nerve wracking.  They are scary little mongrels who are experts at camouflage, and I hope I never, ever, ever meet one in the wild.

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We also spent a short time at the Desert Park. They put on an awesome bird show which showcased their skills.  Whether it was camouflage, silent approach or hunting and speed skills each bird elicited ‘Ooohs and aaahs’ from the crowd.  We raced through the remaining enclosures but spent a little time laughing at the hilarious looking Bustard. He (it could’ve been a she for all I know), reminded me of the bird from ‘Up’.  You know, Kevin!

We’ve shopped, we’ve been tourists, we voted and now we are ready.  Ready to tackle the East and West McDonnell Ranges.  In a tent.  In the freezing cold.  It’ll be alright… I think.

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